Leading LDS http://leadinglds.com Become a Leader, not a Calling Fri, 27 Mar 2015 05:48:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1LDS leaders are faced with problems relating to home/visiting teaching, activation, missionary work, class participation, and many more. It’s time we consider applying established research and innovative ideas in order to find fresh ideas for these perpetual problems. By doing so, it will help leaders approach problems differently. There are also leaders that are currently over-coming problems with ideas that could be shared with the masses. We must find those LDS leaders and invite them to share. We encourage all to share ideas and strategies that have brought success in your respective ward or stake.Whether you are called to preside over meetings or vacuum cereal off benches LeadingLDS is for you. Regardless of your calling all are leaders in the church through example and fellowship. Leading LDS clean Leading LDS kurt@leadinglds.com kurt@leadinglds.com (Leading LDS) Leading in the LDS World Leading LDS http://leadinglds.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Leading-LDS-Podcast.pnghttp://leadinglds.com Articulating Problems Will Motivate Solutions | “Come Down” And Leadhttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/articulating-problems-will-motivate-solutions.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/articulating-problems-will-motivate-solutions.html#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 00:54:52 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2166 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/articulating-problems-will-motivate-solutions.html/feed 0 "Come down"—this is a phrase very commonly found in the scriptures. It is often used in the context of a request to a leader—requesting they "come down" from their mountain or from whatever state they are in. - "Come down"—this is a phrase very commonly found in the scriptures. It is often used in the context of a request to a leader—requesting they "come down" from their mountain or from whatever state they are in.Daniel pleaded for Saul to "come down" (1 Samuel 23:11 & 20), The Lord "came down" to the valley of Nimrod to speak with the brother of Jared (Ether 2:4). There were even times when leaders refused to "come down" because they were involved in "a great work" (Nehemiah 6:3). And, of course, "God himself [came] down among the children of men." Leaders Must "Come Down" Leadership has a natural tendency to put you on a higher level. Not in terms of pride or prestige, but rather, in terms of perspective. As a leader you have a unique perspective to the status of the ward or quorum. You have specific authority or sometimes priesthood keys that give you access to inspiration that nobody else has. For example, an elder's quorum president has access to home teaching reports, attendance reports; he has attended meetings where information about individuals or ward programs are shared. From this exclusive information, the elder's quorum president might see a dramatic attendance drop between sacrament meeting and elder's quorum meeting. Or while others in the quorum are doing their best to home teach, the elder's quorum president can look at his reports and notice 5 specific families not being home taught; and if they were home taught, could have a dramatic impact on the ward.Humans tend to generalize their experience or perspective. People think that because they can see an obvious problem, everyone around them can obviously see the problem. As a leader we then get frustrated why this "obvious" problem isn't being seen and fixed by others in our quorum. It is the duty of the leader to articulate the problem (even the "obvious" problems) so everyone can gain a desire to find a solution. Once the quorum problem is described and the leader invites the quorum to act, those you lead will understand why this is a problem and help you find solutions.In Abraham 3:21 the Lord "[came] down unto [Abraham] to declare unto [him]". Abraham learned important truths of the Lord's plan and learned that he was chosen before he was born." This was an informative experience for Abraham. From this experience he was able to understand his purpose and take action. He could not have gained this understanding without the Lord "coming down" and articulating it to him.I can understand if this seems frustrating. Do we really need to spoon feed people problems? Do they really not see these "obvious" service gaps? As leaders we sometimes feel like the duty of those we lead has already been explained. We feel they clearly understand their expectation to do their home teaching, or magnify their calling. It's true, there are general understandings that have been drilled in to our heads for years (i.e. home teach, take meals to new moms, fellowship those around you, etc.), but these are simply too general. It is crucial for a leader to explain the more detailed problems that face a quorum or group. These details usually include names of individuals struggling, or unique characteristics of your ward that may not be apparent to the arm-chair quarterbacks casually attending week-to-week. For example, a Sunday School president may know that he needs to keep an eye on things during the Sunday School hour, but he may not know that 20% of the ward is leaving before Sunday School begins. Or the Scout leader may know he needs to put on a Wednesday activity each week, but he may not realize Brother Larsen in the elder's quorum has finally made consistent contact with a less-active family with scouting age boys.Communicating from your unique leadership perspective also humanizes the problem, which makes it more likely people will be willing to help fix the problem. Example: Lee Ward Find List A few years ago, as I was serving as bishop, Leading LDS clean 13:12 A Leader’s Role in Overcoming Addiction | Jake & Polly Scotthttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/a-leaders-role-in-overcoming-addiction.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/a-leaders-role-in-overcoming-addiction.html#comments Fri, 20 Mar 2015 14:38:30 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2142 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/a-leaders-role-in-overcoming-addiction.html/feed 0 Jake and Polly Scott are from Centerville, Utah and are powerful influencers in the world of overcoming pornography addiction. In this interview, Jake tells of his struggle with pornography addiction and his journey to find the road to recovery. Jake and Polly Scott are from Centerville, Utah and are powerful influencers in the world of overcoming pornography addiction. In this interview, Jake tells of his struggle with pornography addiction and his journey to find the road to recovery. Polly gives her side of the story about dealing with betrayal trauma after she found out about Jake’s addiction to pornography.We talk about some of the misconceptions of a pornography addiction and most importantly how a bishop (or any LDS leader) can most effectively mentor someone through a pornography addiction. Additional Links: Addo Recovery (Polly is the Editor-in-Chief and Producer & Host of AddoTV)Overcoming Pornography, Jake and Polly's full story on the Mormon ChannelPolly's UpLift Families  speech Leading LDS clean 1:01:26 Teaching Help: Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson | Chapter 7http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-7.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-7.html#comments Sun, 15 Mar 2015 00:05:36 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2125 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-7.html/feed 0 How to Hold Others Accountable | An Interview with Liz Wisemanhttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/liz-wiseman.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/liz-wiseman.html#comments Wed, 11 Mar 2015 04:53:04 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2117 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/liz-wiseman.html/feed 1 Liz Wiseman, is first, a loving mother and an incredible saint in the gospel. She's a Brigham Young University graduate, lives in Silicon Valley and has experience as an executive at Oracle Corporation. That career led her into leadership research and ... Liz Wiseman, is first, a loving mother and an incredible saint in the gospel. She's a Brigham Young University graduate, lives in Silicon Valley and has experience as an executive at Oracle Corporation. That career led her into leadership research and now teaches leadership to executives and emerging leaders internationally.I have been looking forward to getting Liz on the podcast. She has been extremely charitable to me with her time and guidance as I have built LeadingLDS. I contacted her years ago and explained my vision of LeadingLDS. Even as a best-selling author she still took the time to coach me over the phone and has deeply influenced what LeadingLDS is today. I had the opportunity to attend a training Liz did in the California Fresno Mission a few years back when President Larry Gelwix presided over that mission. It was an incredible experience and I learned so much from her at that time.In this interview Sister Wiseman gives priceless advice for LDS leaders regarding that following question:How can you allow others to drop the ball and succeed as a leader? How can a leader hold others accountable? What is genius watching and how can an LDS leader us it? How can bishoprics improve ward council?I look forward to having Sister Liz Wiseman back on the podcast in the future. There was just too many questions to ask with so limited of time. Go buy her books and follow her impact.I have also referenced her work in past posts:Why Your Bishop Should Be A Rookie Get Out of the Way—Allow Natural Consequences to Happen Are You a Multiplier or a Diminisher? Leading LDS clean 53:20 How To Make Ward Council A Revelatory Experience…Or Any Other Meetinghttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/ward-council-a-revelatory-experience.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/ward-council-a-revelatory-experience.html#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 03:10:45 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2115 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/ward-council-a-revelatory-experience.html/feed 76 Meetings in the Church—it's a love/hate thing. Rarely do people enjoy attending meetings but we still discover ways to plan more meetings. - This may come across as a blunt message, but meetings are either well done or toxic and it's important that le... Meetings in the Church—it's a love/hate thing. Rarely do people enjoy attending meetings but we still discover ways to plan more meetings.This may come across as a blunt message, but meetings are either well done or toxic and it's important that leaders get them right. How you run a meeting has a dramatic influence on how you are loved as a leader. If you run a good meeting, those who follow you will be more willing to serve you. If you run a bad meeting, the only thing to increase is the eye-rolling.I want to use Ward Council as the model in this post, but this information can be applied to most meetings within the church. When I say meeting I am not referring to any meetings in the 3 hour block. I'm talking about council meetings (ward council, presidency meetings, stake high council, etc.).Handbook 2 (18.2) tells us that ward council should be held "regularly (at least monthly)." I've heard about general authorities visiting local stakes and encouraging bishops to hold ward council more than just once a month. Some are even mandating ward council to be held weekly.I get it. I don't think these authorities are trying to torture anyone with more meetings. They want the ward council to work together more often and elevate the ward in general; however, I'm not sure if scheduling more meetings is the answer. I'm not saying meeting as a ward council more often is a bad idea; but if you do, make sure you set some clear objectives and rules.Elder David A. Bednar said:If I had the wish of my heart, I would remove from the vocabulary of the Latter-day Saints the word meeting. We have not been talking about a ward council meeting. We've been talking about a revelatory experience with the members of the ward council. And if members of councils, if members of families, as they come together, would think in terms of “I’m preparing to participate in a revelatory experience with my family” instead of going to a meeting—a revelatory experience with the members of the ward council—I think we would prepare and act much differently. In these latter days, given the forces of the adversary and the darkness, no one person in the family and no one person in a ward is going to be the conduit through which all of the answers come. So all of that speaks to the spiritual nature of this work and seeking for the inspiration to do what the Lord wants us to do. (2010 World Wide Leadership Training)So let's agree that you won't hold another meeting unless you have sufficiently outlined it as a revelatory experience. If it isn't, cancel it; it isn't worth holding a meeting that is anything different.In an effort to do this, let's review the 7 Unbreakable Rules of Church Meetings 7 Unbreakable Rules of Church Meetings 1. 60 Minute Limit (seriously) Handbook 2 (4.6) advises ward council should be 60-90 minutes in duration. This is nice encouragement for those holding 3 hour meetings (you should be ashamed), but in reality there is no meeting that needs to go longer than 60 minutes. Do you disagree? (please comment below) Meetings longer than 60 minutes damage your effectiveness as a leader. Nobody enjoys them and they need to stop.If you can't help but go over the 1 hour mark, then you need more discipline through a timer. If you need help with not getting carried away in a meeting, your next meeting should have a kitchen timer present. Set it for 60 minutes and tell everyone in the room they are free to walk out once that timer sounds.There is a concept called Parkinson's law, which states that a meeting (or any task) will expand to fill the time you allotted for it. If you don't give the meeting a time limit, it will grow out of control. This shouldn't be a vague 60 minutes that grows to 90 minutes with the presiding authority stating, "oops, looks like we went 30 minutes over." This is a hard 60 minutes. Once the timer sounds the presiding authority should say, "Well, Leading LDS clean 16:50 Becoming a Face-to-Face Leader| An Interview With Professor Curtis LeBaronhttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/curtis-lebaron-interview.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/curtis-lebaron-interview.html#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 15:47:46 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=33 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/curtis-lebaron-interview.html/feed 0 What is Ethnography and how does it apply to church leadership? What is Ethnography and how does it apply to church leadership? Leading LDS clean 1:09:52 Teaching Help: Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson | Chapter 6http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-6.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-6.html#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 16:11:37 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2088 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/03/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-6.html/feed 1 Teaching Help: Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson | Chapter 5http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-5.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-5.html#comments Sat, 28 Feb 2015 14:59:41 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2075 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/teaching-help-teachings-of-ezra-taft-benson-chapter-5.html/feed 1 “A Prophet Who Asks for Counsel” | Leader to Leader Episode 12http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/a-prophet-who-asks-for-counsel-leader-to-leader-episode-12.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/a-prophet-who-asks-for-counsel-leader-to-leader-episode-12.html#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:43:54 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2070 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/a-prophet-who-asks-for-counsel-leader-to-leader-episode-12.html/feed 0 A story told by Elder Marvin J. Ashton in the April 1985 General Conference A few years ago I was in my office about 6:30 A.M. I am mentioning that so you will know I was there early—it takes some of us a little longer. My phone rang, A story told by Elder Marvin J. Ashton in the April 1985 General ConferenceA few years ago I was in my office about 6:30 A.M. I am mentioning that so you will know I was there early—it takes some of us a little longer. My phone rang, and as I answered it, I recognized that special voice that said, “Marvin.” I replied, “Yes, President Kimball.”He said, “Could I come up and see you?”His office is on the first floor, and mine is on the third. (That is the only time I am ever higher than he is.)My reply was, “President Kimball, if you want to see me, I will be right down.”He then responded with, “Would you do that?”He did not exhibit any authority. There was no feeling of “Do you know who this is?” or “You’d better come.” He courteously asked, “Could I come up and see you?” When I told him I would be right down, his voice reflected gratitude as he said, “Will you do that?”I went to his office in a hurry. After we shook hands, he handed me a letter and said, “How would you answer this?”I read it quickly and said, “President Kimball, you might want to consider this approach,” and told him what I thought. “I agree,” he said. “That is my thinking also.” He shook my hand, and I was on my way, reflecting about a prophet who asks for counsel and puts himself above no man. Leading LDS clean 3:42 Success As Young Women’s President – An Interview With Heather Mechamhttp://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/success-as-young-womens-president-an-interview-with-heather-mecham.html http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/success-as-young-womens-president-an-interview-with-heather-mecham.html#comments Sun, 15 Feb 2015 05:20:38 +0000 http://leadinglds.com/?p=2058 http://leadinglds.com/my-blog/2015/02/success-as-young-womens-president-an-interview-with-heather-mecham.html/feed 0 Heather Mecham was born and raised in Indiana. Moved to Utah about 20 years ago and currently lives in West Jordan, Utah. She has two daughters ages 14 and 17. - Until recently she had been serving as the Young Womens President in her ward until her h... Heather Mecham was born and raised in Indiana. Moved to Utah about 20 years ago and currently lives in West Jordan, Utah. She has two daughters ages 14 and 17.Until recently she had been serving as the Young Womens President in her ward until her husband was called as the Bishop. Heather first reached out to Kurt after his interview with @ldsEQpres recorded in May 2014 to give positive feedback she had received from that episode about creating a fellowshipping plan in the Young Women's organization. In this episode she talks about how she continues to lead as a 2nd Counselor in the Young Women's organization as well as her previous experience in the Relief Society and Primary. Leadership Principles Discussed IncludeBeing a Shadow Leader and Coach and not the Class President as a Youth Leader The process she follows to help class presidencies fulfill their duties as outlined in Handbook 2 : 10.3.5 “We succeed when we invite.”Idea taken from Clayton Christensen's, ‘The Power of Everyday Missionaries’Stand on Doorsteps: "Nimrod or Bust"In Ether 1:42 the Lord commands the Brother of Jared to, “head of them down into the valley which is northward. And there will I meet thee…” In Ether 2:4 we read that the Lord met them in the valley of Nimrod and gave them instruction on how to build their barges that would take them to the promised land. Heather relates that when she feels prompted to make a visit it may not always be clear in the moment what the intention of that visit is, but when she goes to the doorsteps of these individuals the Lord meets her there.Take Good Care of What You Already Have Prepare Spiritually and then Get Out of the Way and Let the Spirit TeachCome Follow Me Youth CurriculumOther Tools and Links ReferencedEvernote Pinterest Links Courtney Taylor Diane Pike Brittany Clark Heather's personal Pinterest boardLDS Gospel Library App Facebook GroupsA big thanks to Jon Albright for writing the summary for this interview. Leading LDS clean 56:21